Alice Again

What would it take to get you to leave it all behind?

In the summer of 2009, Alice Pleasance, mother of a fallen 9-11 police officer, makes a surprising birthday wish for a dreamy dark-eyed young man to notice her just one more time in her life.  It’s all in fun while she blows out the candles and returns home with her gifts including an insomnia cure from a Korean herb shop.   

Later, Alice awakens years younger and racing to prevent her son Luke from going to the Towers only to find she has not gone back in time but has arrived in an alternate New York City under a vibrant red sky.

Alice’s nocturnal travels quickly fill with new friendships and involvements that force her to face her husband’s involvement in her travels.  Red Sky may have started as an innocent time-out from tending to her surviving son, but it’s is getting harder to leave since young dark-eyed Hoon Park has asked her to stay. 

It may only take one lifetime to grow older but you may need two to grow up.

 
Alice Again
By Adrienne D Leslie

Reviews Are In

Paranormal Romance - where have you been all my life? I read this book in three days - it’s that good! Hoon and Alice stir together two cultures in two universes in this surreal yet so-real story that’s both dreamy and delicious. (And I know a thing or two about delicious).
— Christina Seid, blogger, Cofchinatown.com
Mashta is Korean for something so delicious, you’ll want to devour it and savor it at the same time. It’s the perfect description of Adrienne Leslie’s third novel, Alice Again. More intricate than a chronicle an unraveling life and infinitely more satisfying as Alice saves herself from the dark waters of family anguish and comes to accept the sensibilities of escape. I’m not usually a fan of paranormal romance genre, but this is so readable. Leslie’s joie de vivre pokes our consciences and tugs our heartstrings and while there is never a one size fits all conclusion, the choice to leave one’s past behind will definitely satisfy all who read this tale.
— Boklim Peter Choi, columnist, Korea Central Daily